Hot Composting with a GEOBIN

There are many different methods of composting and there are many different commercially available composters that help you to get that work done.  In this post, we review the GEOBIN composting system for its ease of setup, functionality and overall success at making compost.  If you are new to gardening and want to learn more about composting or you are looking for different alternatives to compost, then read on.

 

composting with GEOBIN

Last year, here at the Plant King Blog, we purchased our first GEOBIN system from Amazon for $34.99.  We were so pleased with the success of making compost that we bought a second one this year. It is one of the least expensive and largest capacity composting bins on the market today. The GEOBIN backyard compost system is easy to set up and is ideal for all skill levels. Use the finished compost around flowers and garden plants to amend your soil with rich recycled nutrients. Here are some GEOBIN statistics:

  • Large capacity—expandable up to 4 feet across
  • Easy to assemble with closure keys
  • Made from 50% recycled plastic content
  • Easy to store and reassemble
  • Excellent slotted ventilation 
Geobin composting system
The GEOBIN comes ready to use out of the box. Remove that wrapper and insert the keys. Follow the instructions, it’s that easy.

Backyard Composting Basics: The term “hot composting” refers to a method in which microbial activity within the compost pile is at its optimum level.  The end result is that you end up with finished compost in a much shorter period of time. So what exactly is compost?  Compost is simply decomposed organic matter that is rich in nutrients. Composting is an aerobic process so it requires oxygen. Additionally, nitrogen, carbon, moisture along with beneficial microorganisms are needed as well. Remember making your own compost helps the environment and benefits good insects, soil bacteria and other microorganisms.  The GEOBIN is perfect for hot composting.

Compost Pile Size: The size of your compost bin or pile is very important when it comes to hot composting. The GEOBIN is about 4 feet wide and 3 feet tall.  These dimensions happen to be ideal is for hot composting.  Smaller piles will not generate sufficient heat and larger piles become unmanageable. The composting system should be placed in full sun, less sun will slow down the process.

A working geobin
A GEOBIN in action, fill it up, watch it work.

How do you start a compost pile? The idea behind hot composting is to get the pile to heat up as fast as possible. For this to occur, we need a large amount of organic matter, with the correct carbon to nitrogen ratio, right from the start. This carbon to nitrogen ratio enhances microbial activity and ramps up the composting process.  If you are interested in composting then you will need to collect organic material from the table below.  Add the materials to the GEOBIN, mix well, add water.  If you have older compost mix, it is already teeming with microorganisms and will serve as an activator, add it to the new pile.

Carbon-Rich Materials Nitrogen-Rich Materials
Straw Grass clippings
Shredded paper Fresh cut weeds
Corn Stalks Vegetable and fruit scraps
Fall leaves Deadheading
Twigs Coffee grounds

Compost Happens: The optimal temperature for microbial activity is 130 to 140 degrees Fahrenheit. At that temperature, microbes break down organic matter and reproduce at high rates. This temperature range is also hot enough to kill most weed seeds and harmful bacteria in the pile. The composting process also requires water.  The contents of your compost pile should feel like a wrung-out sponge.

Compost
Happiness is well-made compost. Thank you, GEOBIN.

If you are having problems with your compost pile, don’t give up hope.  For a compost pile that does not heat up, try the following:

  • the pile is too small
  • not enough air
  • not enough nitrogen
  • the pile is too wet or too dry

Good luck composting, if you have any questions or comments please post them below.

Happy Gardening, from The Plant King.

 

 

 

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.